CRRC Seminar Series Dr. Pascale Roy-Léveillee

Presented by Dr. Pascale Roy-Léveillee,
Chaire de recherche en partenariat Sentinelle Nord Nunavik sur le pergélisol Foresterie, géographie et géomatique Département de géographie Chercheure, Centre d'études nordiques Université Laval

CRRC Seminar Series Pandemic Pivots

Despite an unprecedented global health crisis, cold regions research has continued, adapted, transformed, and in many cases thrived, as researchers respond to the new and uncertain context of the past 18 months. This session will explore three perspectives from Cold Regions Research Centre graduate students who have had to make significant changes to their research design.

The speakers for this seminar are:
Jeremy Harbinson, MSc Student in the Remote Sensing of Environmental Change Research Group - Contrasting under-ice cycling of arsenic in a series of subarctic shield lakes with different morphometric properties
Mackenzie Bell, MA Student in the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies - Pandemic Pivots: Climate Change Research in the Dehcho during Covid – 19
Alexis Jorgensen, MSc Student in the Forest Ecology Research Group - Boreal fire research during the pandemic

All are welcome to join this event and participate in a discussion of doing graduate research during the COVID-19 pandemic

CRRC Seminar Series – Stephen Howell

Climate change has driven reductions in sea ice and this in turn has facilitated increased ship traffic across the Arctic. The latest-state-of-the-art climate models project profound shifts in ship-accessible season length, with 100% navigation probability for part of the year, regardless of vessel type, above 2 °C of global warming for many regions within the Canadian Arctic, including the Northwest Passage. However, climate models do not capture local-scale ice dynamic processes that pose hazardous conditions to ships transiting through the Canadian Arctic. One such process is the collapse of the ice arches in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago and Nares Strait that allows thick multi-year ice from Arctic Ocean to flow southward into shipping lanes. Satellite derived sea ice motion from RADARSAT-1, RADARSAT-2, Sentinel-1, and the RADARSAT Constellation Mission was used to document the sea ice area (and volume) flux through these regions since 1997. Results indicate that these regions are becoming even larger outlets for Arctic Ocean ice area loss because of climate change. Continuation of this process will be problematic for the maritime industry.

CRRC Days Pre-Conference Technical Workshop

Dr. Jed Long's research involves using geographic information systems (GIS) and other spatial analysis techniques in the study of movement (e.g., using GPS tracking). He is interested in developing and applying novel methods for spatial and space-time analysis. I am also interested in other research areas relating more broadly to GIScience; including spatial modelling, volunteered geographic information (and non-traditional data), and map comparison. Finally, as a huge sports fan, Jed is fascinated by ways spatial data and analysis can be used in sports analytics.

CRRC Days Emerging Leader Keynote – Frances Stewart

Dr. Frances Stewart is a new faculty member in the Biology department at Laurier. Her research group (the WILDlab) uses northern wildlife to understand current species-habitat relationships, management and conservation efficacy, while considering future landscape change. Dr. Stewart started her graduate work in Algonquin park while a MSc student at Guelph, and has since conducted and led large trapping, GPS collaring, wildlife camera, and ecological forecasting work in the Yukon, NWT, Alberta, and British Columbia. She is excited to bring this experience with her to Laurier and to learning more about everyone else’s work being conducted through the Cold Regions Research Centre.

CRRC Days Closing Keynote – Andrew Weaver

Dr. Andrew J. Weaver is a Professor in the School of Earth and Ocean Sciences at the University of Victoria. He was also the Canada Research Chair in Climate Modelling and Analysis until he was elected as a BC Green Party MLA in the 2013 BC Provincial Election representing the riding of Oak Bay-Gordon Head. Dr. Weaver received his B.Sc (Mathematics and Physics) from the University of Victoria in 1983, a Master of Advanced Studies in Mathematics from Cambridge University in 1984, and a PhD in Applied Mathematics from the University of British Columbia in 1987. He has authored or coauthored over 200 peer-reviewed papers in climate, meteorology, oceanography, earth science, policy, education and anthropology journals. He was a Lead Author in the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th scientific assessments. He was the Chief Editor of the Journal of Climate from 2005-2009.