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CRRC Workshop

The CRRC is hosting a workshop/discussion group introducing R, the highly flexible and open source statistical software program. We are hoping that this will become a regular event, with different people imparting their expertise in software or analysis.

No prior knowledge of R or coding is required!

Learn:
– the basic concepts of R
– tips and tricks
– tools for problem-solving

An understanding of basic statistics will be assumed.

Wednesday 27 January 2016
12-1:30
Arts 2E7

DCIM101MEDIA

Scotty Creek Day 2015

The annual Scotty Creek Day will be held at the CCRWS on Friday, 20th November. This event features student presentation, networking and planning for all work being conducted at the Scott Creek Research Camp near Ft. Simpson, NT. The purpose of this day is to provide a friendly and informal setting where students and faculty working at the camp can provide feedback on their research, while benefitting from the feedback that they will provide to them.

For more information, please contact us at info@coldregions.ca

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Laurier-Government of Northwest Territories Partnership receives funding to build world-class research infrastructure throughout the Northwest Territories

WATERLOO – Wilfrid Laurier University’s Changing Arctic Network (CANet) research team has been awarded $3.2 million in funding from the Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI) to continue to build Laurier’s global leadership in cold regions environmental research.

Climate warming is resulting in dramatic changes to ecosystems across the Canadian North, including conversion of forests to wetlands and tundra to shrub landscapes. It is also changing the quantity and quality of water in streams, rivers, and lakes, and thawing permafrost at unprecedented rates.

“Building on our partnership with the Government of the Northwest Territories, formalized in 2010, this funding allows us to grow and deepen the resources available for our joint work,” said Deborah MacLatchy, vice-president: academic and provost, and acting vice-president: research at Laurier. “This CFI funding will support our transformative research infrastructure that enables the discoveries about the North that will improve the lives of Canadians.”

Increasingly, circumpolar countries are looking to the Canadian North as an ideal location for conducting essential northern research. This knowledge is needed to understand the global implications of a changing climate. CANet will support world-leading infrastructure to meet these globally important research challenges.

“Northern Canada is one of the most rapidly warming regions on Earth,” said Jennifer Baltzer, associate professor of Biology and Canada Research Chair in Forest and Global Change. “The Changing Arctic Network will carry out integrated ecosystem studies to better understand the changes that are occurring to the tundra, forests, streams, rivers and lakes.”

In addition to these changes, the Canadian North is expected to undergo increased mining, oil and gas exploration and production and construction of new highways and pipelines in the coming years.

“There is an urgent need to better understand the impact of a changing climate on the environment, and to begin preparing for increased resource development in the North,” said Philip Marsh, professor of Geography and Environmental Studies and Canada Research Chair in Cold Regions Water Science. “The CANet infrastructure platform will allow the Partnership to enhance its world-class research infrastructure throughout the Northwest Territories.”

This funding will provide the Government of the Northwest Territories and the Government of Canada with improved knowledge about these fragile northern environments, how to manage the forests, waters and fish of these regions and ensure that northern resources are developed in a sustainable manner.

CANet is interested in changes in flood frequency of rivers, in changes of water quality and in changes to the fish that inhabit these waters. “CANet will couple state-of-the-science research stations with neighbouring communities to facilitate knowledge development and sharing between scientists and local land users,” said William Quinton, associate professor of Geography and Environmental Studies and Canada Research Chair in Cold Regions Hydrology.

In addition to research stations, the infrastructure funding will support 20 “living laboratories”, each representing a widely occurring bio-physical environment; plus, updates to three environment and natural resources laboratories in the Northwest Territories.

Partners on the project include the Government of the Northwest Territories, Université de Montréal, University of Guelph and the Laurier Institute of Water Science and the Cold Regions Research Centre.

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From WLU (http://legacy.wlu.ca/news_detail.php?grp_id=0&nws_id=14071)

Postdoctoral & Graduate opportunities in Cold Regions Hydrology, Ecology, Remote Sensing

Current Opportunities

Postdoctoral & Graduate opportunities in Cold Regions Hydrology, Ecology, Remote Sensing

Postdoctoral (1)*, M.Sc. (5) and Ph.D. (2) positions in hydrology, ecology, remote sensing, and numerical modelling are available from the Consortium for Permafrost Ecosystems in Transition (CPET). CPET is a growing, well-funded, dynamic and interdisciplinary research project focused on improving the understanding of and ability to predict the impacts of permafrost thaw on water resources and ecosystems. Students will have the opportunity to conduct field studies in a variety of landscapes over a 500 km South-to-North transect extending from Fort Nelson, BC to Wrigley, NWT, and including the well-established research station at Scotty Creek, near Fort Simpson. This transect traverses the southern fringe of permafrost where climate warming and human disturbance has led to widespread permafrost thaw and land-cover change with unknown consequences to water resources and ecosystems.

Students will work closely with CPET’s partners in government, local communities, including Aboriginal communities, and industry. CPET is supported by several agencies including NSERC, CFI and the Canada Research Chairs programme (http://www.chairs-chaires.gc.ca). CPET contributes to the Cold Regions Research Centre (coldregions.ca) and the Taiga Plains Research Network (tiagaplains.ca). It is also a key component of the Laurier-Government of the Northwest Territories Partnership Agreement (http://www.wlu.ca/research/LaurierNWT) aimed at expanding the Territories’ capacity to conduct environmental research and to train the next generation of northern expertise.

Banting Postdoctoral Fellowship in Cold Regions Hydrology, Ecology or Remote Sensing: This Fellowship provides funding “to the very best postdoctoral applicants, both nationally and internationally, who will positively contribute to the country’s economic, social and research based growth”.  Full details are available from: http://banting.fellowships-bourses.gc.ca. Successful candidates will receive funding for two years at $70,000 per year. Applicants are asked to submit to Dr. W. Quinton by July 15, 2015, a cover letter that includes a statement of interest, a CV, and the names and email addresses of three referees. An outstanding candidate will be selected, at which time a full proposal will be developed in collaboration with Dr. Quinton and submitted by 15 August, 2015.

Applicants with appropriate academic backgrounds, outdoor experience, and/or modelling ability are encouraged to contact:

Dr. William Quinton, Department of Geography & Environmental Studies, Wilfrid Laurier University**

Expertise: Cold regions hydrology. Contact: wquinton@wlu.ca

Dr. Jennifer Baltzer, Department of Biology, Wilfrid Laurier University.

Expertise: Forest ecology. Contact: jbaltzer@wlu.ca

Dr. Aaron Berg, Department of Geography, University of Guelph.

Expertise: Remote sensing & hydrology. Contact: aberg@uoguelph.ca

Dr. James Craig, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo.

Expertise: Hydrological modelling. Contact: jrcraig@uwaterloo.ca

**The Laurier – University of Waterloo joint graduate programme in geography is one of the largest programmes in Canada.

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Laurier to host first public discussion with leaders behind historic agreement governing Canada’s largest watershed

The Cold Regions Research Network is proud to be a part of this event. 

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From the Wilfrid Laurier University Website:

WATERLOO – Two key players in the recent negotiation of an historic agreement between the Northwest Territories and Alberta to govern the water resources of Canada’s largest watershed will visit Wilfrid Laurier University for the first-ever public discussion of a deal that will affect transboundary water issues across Canada and beyond.

Minister Michael Miltenberger of the Government of the Northwest Territories (NWT) and Chief Negotiator Merrell-Ann Phare will explore the implications of the Mackenzie River Basin Transboundary Agreementfor Canadian water and energy policies and they will share their story that led to its signing by the NWT and Alberta governments in March.

Laurier’s President and Vice-Chancellor Max Blouw will moderate the discussion, which will take place April 29 starting at 1:30 p.m. in the Maureen Forrester Recital Hall on Laurier’s Waterloo campus.

To see more of this press release, and for more information on the event. Please follow this link

Graduate Opportunities Available

Five Graduate Student Positions Available

The Consortium for Permafrost Ecosystems in Transition (CPET) is looking for seven graduate students (5 M.Sc., 2 Ph.D.) with an interest in hydrology, ecology, remote sensing, and/or modelling. This dynamic interdisciplinary research project focuses on improving the understanding of permafrost thaw impacts, and includes both field and modelling investigations of hydrological and ecological changes resulting from permafrost thaw. Most students will have the opportunity to participate in fieldwork in the bog-fen landscapes of the Northern Territories and Northern British Columbia. Students will work closely with CPET’s partners in industry, government and local communities, including Aboriginal communities.

CPET is a major initiative of the Taiga Plains Research Network (www.taigaplains.ca) that is focussed on the British Columbia – Northwest Territories border region, where climate warming and human disturbance has led to widespread permafrost thaw and land-cover change.

For more information, please contact any of:

Dr. Jennifer Baltzer, Department of Biology, Wilfrid Laurier University.

Expertise: Forest ecology

Contact: jbaltzer@wlu.ca

Dr. Aaron Berg, Department of Geography, University of Guelph.

Expertise: Remote sensing & hydrology

Contact: aberg@uoguelph.ca

Dr. James Craig, Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering, University of Waterloo.

Expertise: Hydrological modelling

Contact: jrcraig@uwaterloo.ca

Dr. William Quinton, Department of Geography, Wilfrid Laurier University

Expertise: Cold regions hydrology.

Contact: wquinton@wlu.ca